An analysis of the characters in the novel the fountainhead by ayn rand

His relationship with Roark, however, inspires him. Keating requests that Roark design it and allow Keating to take the credit for it. Roark seizes the drawing and marks over it, restoring his original work. Dominique discovers that this is what she had needed, but when she looks for Roark, he has left the quarry to design a building for a prominent New York businessman.

Men, Women and Rapedenounced what she called "Rand's philosophy of rape", for portraying women as wanting "humiliation at the hands of a superior man". Wanting to build a home for himself and his new wife, Wynand discovers that Roark designed every building he likes and so hires him.

Read an in-depth analysis of Dominique Francon. His unwillingness to compromise his designs in order to satisfy clients eventually forces him to close down the office and take a job at a granite quarry in Connecticut.

People come, and the resort is successful. He hires Steven Mallory to do the sculpture for the Temple. Keating believes his eclectic hodgepodge of conflicting styles has no chance to win; he must get the partnership now, while Francon still trusts him.

When Wynand is out of town in a desperate attempt to save an advertising contract, Toohey strikes. In the opening chapter, the dean of his architecture school tells Roark that the best architecture must copy the past rather than innovate or improve.

Heyer dies, having left the charming Keating his money. Roark agrees in exchange for complete anonymity and Keating's promise that it will be built exactly as designed. She is an avant-garde writer who dispenses with coherent sentence structure. About whose sculptures does Roark say: Roark points out that it was he who designed Cortlandt and that he was not paid for his work.

The Fountainhead Analysis

Roark dynamites the project to prevent the subversion of his vision. Toohey, who writes a popular architecture column in the Banner, is an outspoken socialist who shapes public opinion through his column and a circle of influential associates.

He is a rotted-out shell of a man.

The Fountainhead Summary

One publisher after another turned down the manuscript before an editor at the Indianapolis-based firm of Bobbs-Merrill took a chance on it. Dominique speaks in Roark's defense, but he loses the case. Roark — in your own way.

He is tall, gaunt, and angular, with gray eyes and distinctive orange hair. The Fountainhead’s major theme is the need for integrity and independence as exemplified in the career of Howard Roark.

Roark is the fountainhead, or productive force, in the novel. To develop this theme, Rand places Roark in contrast with three other men, Peter Keating, Ellsworth Toohey, and Gail Wynand. The novel begins with a jarring contrast. The Fountainhead Summary SuperSummary, a modern alternative to SparkNotes and CliffsNotes, offers high-quality study guides that feature detailed chapter summaries and analysis of major themes, characters, quotes, and essay topics.

An important moral question that Ayn Rand seeks to answer in Roark's character concerns the relationship between the moral and the practical. Many people in real life — as well as Gail Wynand and Dominique Francon in the novel — believe that practical success requires a betrayal of.

Roark is the fountainhead, or productive force, in the novel. To develop this theme, Rand places Roark in contrast with three other men, Peter Keating, Ellsworth Toohey, and Gail Wynand.

The Triumphant Characters of Anthem, The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged In reading the fiction works of Ayn Rand, one becomes quickly aware of her use of characterization to display a set of mores that apply to a group in today's society she is describing.

Howard Roark The hero of the story. It is his struggle to succeed as an architect on his own terms that forms the essence of the novel's conflict. His independent functioning serves as a standard by which to judge the other characters — either they are like Roark or they allow others, in one form or another, to control their lives.

An analysis of the characters in the novel the fountainhead by ayn rand
Rated 3/5 based on 2 review
Book Info: The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand